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Shoe Embroidery: Zhang Yi Gui 张艺桂 – Cultural Heritage Quan Bei Village, Shandong Province Posted Dec 17, 2010 by Chinavine

Aesthetic conceptions, cultural traditions, ethics and morals, as well as the fashion of different dynasties, have all been expressed through the art of embroidery. Chinese embroidery has four major traditional styles: Su, Shu, Xiang, and Yue. 1. Su is the ...

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Shoe Embroidery: Zhang Yi Gui 张艺桂 – Gallery Quan Bei Village, Shandong Province Posted Dec 17, 2010 by Chinavine

Embroidered shoes reflect a sense of elegance, refinement, and tranquility. The themes used in shoe embroidery come from ordinary everyday items like animals, birds, and flowers, and from village traditions. It is customary in Quan Bei Village for young boys ...

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Shoe Embroidery: Zhang Yi Gui 张艺桂 – Artist At Work Quan Bei Village, Shandong Province Posted Dec 17, 2010 by Chinavine

This video shows Zhang Yi Gui carefully hand-embroidering shoes.

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Shoe Embroidery: Zhang Yi Gui 张艺桂 – Introduction Quan Bei Village, Shandong Province Posted Dec 17, 2010 by Chinavine

Zhang Yi Gui is in her eighties and lives in Quan Bei Village. Working alongside Miao Yu Zhi, her daughter-in-law, Zhang Yi Gui embroiders designs for children’s shoes. It is customary for small babies to wear the embroidered shoes with ...

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Zhujiajiao Water Village – Introduction Shanghai Province Posted Aug 30, 2010 by Chinavine

Nestled 30 miles away from the busy Shanghai metropolis, lies the “water village” of Zhujiajiao, a designated World Heritage site whose close proximity to a network of willow-shaded canals evokes comparisons to Italy’s Venice. Though the town originated 1,700 years ...

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Beijing Hutongs – Introduction Beijing Province Posted Aug 17, 2010 by Chinavine

The hutong were originally designed during the Zhou Dynasty when the residential areas of Beijing began to take shape. The word hutong comes from the Mongolian word hottog which means “water well.” The term came into use under the reign ...

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